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Nieuws van Nano-Tsunami (april 2004)

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Offline OhWiseone

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Nieuws van Nano-Tsunami (april 2004)
« on: April 01, 2004, 10:05:23 AM »
FEI Company Breaks the 1 Angstrom High Resolution Imaging Barrier

FEI Company (Nasdaq: FEIC) have announced that scientists at the company's nanotechnology center have broken the one Angstrom image resolution barrier with a 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM). FEI believes that this is the first time images can be directly viewed with a resolution of less than one Angstrom using commercially available technologies. One Angstrom isone-tenth of a nanometer in size, and a nanometer is one billionth of a meter. One Angstrom is also approximately one-third the size of a carbon atom and is a key dimension for atomic level research. ...read the wave www.nano-tsunami.com

(directe link naar artikel: http://www.voyle.net/Nano%20Research/research00009%20.htm)
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 11:55:21 AM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami: Nano's Troubled Waters, Latest toxic warning
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2004, 11:05:41 AM »
Nano's Troubled Waters:

Latest toxic warning shows nanoparticles cause brain damage in aquatic species and highlights need for a moratorium on the release of new nanomaterials

A new study revealing that engineered carbon molecules known as "buckyballs" cause brain damage in fish is one more brick in the wall of evidence suggesting that manufactured nanoparticles are harmful to the environment and to health. The results of the study highlight the urgency to heed ETC Group's 2002 call for a moratorium on manufactured nanoparticles in commercial products and they back up last month's recommendation by the Institut f|r vkologische Wirtschaftforschung - in a report commissioned by the European Parliament…read the wave  www.nano-tsunami.com

directe link:
http://www.voyle.net/Nano%20Debate/Debate2004-0004.htm
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 11:56:45 AM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Carnegie Mellon University researchers create nanoparticles to clean up contaminated sites

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and the U.S. Department of Energy are developing "smart" nanoparticles to clean up environmental toxins that resist conventional remediation methods. This research was presented by Greg Lowry on Wednesday, March 31, at the 227th annual meeting of the American Chemical Society in Anaheim, Cal. (ENVR 52, Marriott-Grand Ballroom D).
Pollutants in the ground that do not easily mix with water, such as organic solvents, are a continued source of groundwater pollution until they are removed. …read the wave  www.nano-tsunami.com

directe link:
http://www.voyle.net/Nano%20Research/research00010%20.htm
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 11:57:45 AM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami : FUTURE OF MEDICAL CARE
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2004, 09:59:33 AM »
SMART SENSORS THAT DETECT AND DELIVERY THERAPIES WILL TRANSFORM THE FUTURE OF MEDICAL CARE.

Convergence with Drug Delivery Systems and Nanotechnology Promises to Improve Patients' Lives, Ease Pain and Keep Patients out Of Hospitals

Just as sophisticated automobile sensors improve gas mileage and provide increased safety and protection for drivers and passengers, rapid advances in the use of smart sensors implanted in the human body promise to prevent deaths, ease pain, and help the elderly live more independently.

The Health Technology Center's (HealthTech) latest report, The Future of Sensors for Monitoring, describes the transition of already widely used sensor technologies from merely sending early warning signals to physicians to actually delivering therapeutic responses to patients whenever needed....read the wave www.nano-tsunami.com

directe link:
http://www.voyle.net/Nano%20Medicine/Medicine%202004-0002.htm
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 11:59:25 AM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami: NanoTech still has some big questions to answer
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2004, 10:02:36 AM »
Nanotechnology still has some big questions to answer

Western states are hoping to cash in on the next big technological boom - nanotechnology. Billions of dollars are being invested into what is likely to become a global trillion-dollar-a-year industry.

Yet what are the consequences of this new industry to the people of Salmon Nation? What are the potential problems for salmon, and the other creatures that live here?

Last week scientists presented the first study to look at the health effects of microscopic, specially engineered particles on aquatic critters.

The news was bad -- the nanoproducts introduced into the water seem to trigger organ damage and other toxic effects on fish in ways that researchers did not anticipate. …read the wave www.nano-tsunami.com

directe link:
http://www.tidepool.org/original_content.cfm?articleid=112438
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:00:44 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami : New Nanotech Device Could Revolutionize Blood Testing
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2004, 09:41:49 AM »
New Nanotech Device Could Revolutionize Blood Testing

Like the small fingerstick devices that have revolutionized management of insulin therapy for people with diabetes, BioSensus, Inc., is developing a rapid and inexpensive monitor for anticoagulant therapy that could make a major difference for millions of patients.

It could also send BioSensus over the top as an overnight success in the medical device industry. The company is eying a $1 billion blood coagulation and hemostatic assay market, according to NanoBiotech News, the only weekly, independent news source on the business and science of nanomedicine development.

Worldwide, about 6 million people are treated with oral anticoagulant therapy to prevent the formation of blood clots in atrial fibrillation, deep vein thrombosis, heart attack, stroke and other potentially life-threatening conditions. In American hospitals, hundreds of thousands of patients receive intravenous heparin therapy on a temporary basis, to reduce the risk of clots….read the wave www.nano-tsunami.com

link naar artikel:

http://www.laboratorynetwork.com/content/news/article.asp?docid=%7B5aff0845-e447-419e-b76c-685227f3407e%7D
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:02:00 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami: Nanotechnology and Damage
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2004, 09:43:24 AM »
Nanotechnology and Damage

As regular readers of this column know, I've been rather critical of the nanotechnology industry's recent public relations strategies. In short -- scared that advanced nanotechnology might spook the public with fears of Michael Crichtonesque scenarios of death and destruction -- the industry has been pooh-poohing not those scary scenarios, but the very possibility of advanced nanotechnology itself. I suppose they figure that if they can convince people that advanced nanotechnology is impossible, they can convince people that there's nothing to worry about.

I fear they have chosen poorly in selecting this strategy. There's plenty to pooh-pooh in the scary scenarios, as this debunking by Freeman Dyson makes clear. (And as, in a different fashion, Robert Freitas makes clear.) …read the wave www.nano-tsunami.com



link naar originele artikel:
http://www.techcentralstation.com/040604D.html
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:03:54 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami : European NanoTech Funds
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2004, 12:02:57 PM »
European NanoTech Funds

For some people this is real science!  

We have just started listing European NanoTech Fund information along side our US NanoTech Fund data....read the wave

www.nano-tsunami.com
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:05:03 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami: Enzyme "Ink" Shows Potential for Nanomanufacturing
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2004, 11:18:18 AM »
Enzyme "Ink" Shows Potential for Nanomanufacturing

ARLINGTON, VA—Duke University engineers have demonstrated that enzymes can be used to create nanoscale patterns on a gold surface. Since many enzymes are already commercially available and well characterized, the potential for writing with enzyme "ink" represents an important advance in nanomanufacturing.
This research was funded by the National Science Foundation through a Nanotechnology Interdisciplinary Research Initiative (NIRT) grant.

Enzymes are nature's catalysts -- proteins that stimulate chemical reactions in the body and are used in a wide range of industrial processes, from wastewater treatment to cheese making to dissolving blood clots after heart attacks.

In their experiments, the engineers used an enzyme called DNase I as an "ink" in a process called dip-pen nanolithography -- a technique for etching or writing at the nanoscale level. The dip-pen allowed them to inscribe precise stripes of DNase I ink on a gold plate, which they had previously coated with a thick forest of short DNA strands. The stripes of the enzyme were 100 nanometers wide -- about one-millionth the diameter of a human hair....read the wave
www.nano-tsunami.com

link naar artikel:
http://www.voyle.net/Nano%20Research/research00027%20.htm

picture below:
Duke University's Ashutosh Chilkoti explains how a nanoscale "pen" laid down thin trails of enzyme "ink," which then carved out the 400-nanometer-wide channels shown in the background.
Credit: Duke University photo by Jim Wallace

« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:09:53 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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IBM, Stanford Collaborate on World-Class Spintronics Research

IBM and Stanford University are joining forces on the advanced research and creation of new high-performance, low-power electronics in the emerging field of nanotechnology called "spintronics." To formalize the effort, scientists at IBM's Almaden Research Center and Stanford University today announced the formation of the IBM-Stanford Spintronic Science and Applications Center (SpinAps, for short).

"SpinAps researchers will work to create breakthroughs that could revolutionize the electronics industry, just as the transistor did 50 years ago," said Dr. Robert Morris, IBM VP and director of the Almaden Research Center.

Since its inception, the microelectronics industry has progressed by shrinking circuitry. This approach is becoming much more difficult, time-consuming and expensive, and there is now a worldwide search for new ideas that can deliver improved performance in smaller sizes than is possible with conventional designs. Spintronics is an exciting possibility because controlling the spin -- or magnetic orientation -- of electrons within tiny structures made of ultra-thin layers can produce such advantageous properties as low-power switching and nonvolatile information storage....read the wave www.nano-tsunami.com

volledige artikel:
http://www.voyle.net/Nano%20Research/research00028%20.htm
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:10:51 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Sandia/UNM self-assembly process forms durable nanocrystal arrays and independent nanocrystals.

Possible uses include biological labeling, laser light, catalysts, memory storage, and relief for physicists.

A wish list for nanotechnologists might consist of a simple, inexpensive means - actually, any means at all - of self-assembling nanocrystals into robust orderly arrangements, like soup cans on a shelf or bricks in a wall, each separated from the next by an insulating layer of silicon dioxide.
The silica casing could be linked to compatible semiconductor devices. The trapped nanocrystals might function as a laser, their frequency dependent on their size, or as a very fine catalyst with unusually large surface area, or perhaps a memory device tunable by particle size and composition. Or perhaps the technologist might want to stop nanocrystals from clumping. Agglomeration prevents them from being used as light-emitting tagging mechanisms to track cancer cells in the body and from being used in light-emitting devices needed for solid state lighting….read the wave  www.nano-tsunami.com
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:13:27 PM by Robert »

Offline OhWiseone

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Nano Tsunami:Nanogold does not glitter, but its future looks bright
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2004, 12:37:28 PM »
Nanogold does not glitter, but its future looks bright

All that glitters is not gold, goes the old adage.

But the shrinking frontiers of science require a qualifier: Gold itself does not always glitter.

In fact, if gold is created in small enough chunks, it turns red, blue, yellow and other colors, says Chris Kiely, who directs the new Nanocharacterization Laboratory in Lehigh's Center for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology.

Kiely, a professor of materials science and engineering, explores the properties of "nanogold," or gold particles so tiny - containing only hundreds or even tens of atoms - that they must be measured in nanometers. (One nm is equal to one one-billionth of a meter.)

As is true with other materials, gold in "nano" form exhibits different properties from bulk gold.

"As everyone knows," says Kiely, "normal bulk gold is shiny, it is gold in color, it is inert, and it conducts electricity.

"If, however, you shrink gold down to a nanoparticle, its properties change dramatically. Its color changes, it becomes a very good catalyst, and is no longer a metal - instead it turns into a semiconductor." ...read the wave

www.nano-tsunami.com

llink naar artikel:
http://www.voyle.net/Future%20Technology/Future%202004-0009%20.htm
« Last Edit: May 01, 2004, 12:14:19 PM by Robert »

Offline Robert

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Re:Nieuws van Nano-Tsunami (april 2004)
« Reply #12 on: May 01, 2004, 12:18:46 PM »
VOOR EEEN VOLLEDIG OVERZICTH VAN NANO TSUNAMI NIEUWS (April 2004)

http://www.voyle.net/Nano-Tsunami%20Archive%202004/04-2004%20Archive%20News.htm